Peter Brown Family History

Properties in West Hoathly

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There are a number of properties in West Hoathly belonging to common ancestors. Some of these properties stayed in the family whilst others were sold to or inherited by other linked families.

The following is a list of the main properties in the mid 1500's that have been identified with their owners. Sources for information are varied so may be inaccurate or inconsistent. They include Wills, historical archives and "The Story of a Forest Village - West Hoathly", by Ursula Ridley.

Property Name Occupied  or Owned by in mid 1500's History & later ownership
     
Ashcombe Thomas Payne  
Barlands Richard Infield  
BarleyLands (or Philpots) Thomas Comber  
Baskings Edward Payne (brother of John) Later owned by George Payne and then George Browne and then Edward Browne
Brickland Thomas Payne  
Chantlers Thomas Wood  
Charlwood   Owned in about 1610 by Edward Payne of Twyford (son of John of Stoneland)
Cockwebbs  (Later called Cobwebs) Richard Infield Main home of Infields prior to Gravetye (owned by William in 1400’s). Inherited by Henry Faulconer in 1647 and sold to John Watson 2 years later. John leased it to Nicholas Mason in 1656
Coombe Lands purchased from John Mascal by Thomas Browne Inherited by Abel Browne and later by Joseph Browne
Coombe farm Thomas Browne Initially rented by Thomas Browne from Francis Carew then presumably purchased
Ducketts Chaloner Built in 1538
Duckylls John Dungate Been in the family since early 1400’s
Fieldwick-Old House John Feldwick Inherited by William Feldwick and later by his son John
Gravetye Manor Richard Infield Lands bought by Richard Infield from Bellhouse family  in about 1568. Manor built in 1597. Owned jointly by Henry Faulconer, Cordelia Infield (Watson) and Bridget Infield in 1635. Henry had full ownership in 1647 and sold to Edward Payne of EG in 1651.
Gravetye Moat William Bellhouse Was a half timbered house. Originally owned by Lord Audley and then by William Bellhouse in 1511 after Audley beheaded in 1497. Actual moat house still occupied by Bellhouse family in 1610.
Hickpotts John Easton  
Horncombe   Owned by John Easton
Manor House (or Great House as previously called). Probably initially rented by John Browne in 1524 from Lewes Monks. Later occupied by Edward Browne & relatives (Thomas & George+ later his widowed sisters). Later owned by Nathanial Browne

Situated between the Priest House & the Parsonage. Catherine Infield (widow of Richard- but actually her son James) purchased in 1627 from Nathanial Browne and extended it (costing £1000).
Inherited by Cordelia Infield & John Watson in 1647 and left to John Browne in 1668 (marriage dowry)

Lower Barn   Built by Lewes Monks in early 1400’s. Owned by John Browne in 1650’s.
Monks Hill   Owned in about 1610 by Edward Payne of Twyford (son of John of Stoneland)
Nicholles (Or Homewoods) John Feldwick Inherited by William Feldwick and later by his son John
Parsonage Hill Thomas Browne Leased to Andrew Browne
Pendants Andrew Browne  
Plawe (the) Richard Infield A large wood near the Great Park
Priest House Thomas Browne Built by Lewes Monks in early 1400’s. Initially rented by John Browne in 1524 from Lewes Monks and purchased by Thomas Browne in 1560. Inherited by son John Browne
Rowe Giffords Farm Richard Infield Inherited by Cordelia Infield & John Watson in 1647 and then left to John Browne in 1668 (marriage dowry)
Snegs Hill Edward Payne (brother of John) Later owned by George Payne and then George Browne and then Edward Browne
Stone or Stonehurst Thomas  Payne (brother of John)  
Stoneland John Payne Later owned by Thomas Payne and then Edward Payne
Strudegate Thomas Dungate Purchased from Sir William Culpeper in 1651. Sold to Nicholas Mills in 1675. Possibly occuped by Richard Willerd in 1583 (see Ardingly baptism)
Tinkeridge Thomas Benke & relatives  
Whitestone & Webb Mead. Thomas Browne Inherited by Edward, Thomas & George Browne from father.
Wyldegooseland ( also known as Selsfield Place) Owned by Thomas Infield but  rented by Richard Myles from him. Originally owned by John Wyldegoose in 1450’s ( & grandfather John and father Thomas before him) . Inherited by Henry Faulconer in 1647 and sold to John Watson 2 years later. John Watson left to John Browne in 1668 (marriage dowry).
1650’s Properties
Finch field John Watson Inherited by John Browne in 1668 (marriage dowry).
Jenkynsfield John Watson Inherited by John Browne in 1668 (marriage dowry).
MaltHouse John Watson Inherited by John Browne in 1668 (marriage dowry).
Rock farm (Duckyls farm) John Watson Inherited by John Browne in 1668 (marriage dowry).
     
     
OTHER LINKED PROPERTIES    
Brambletye (Forest Row) Henry Compton  
Burstow Park (Godstone) Richard Infield Purchased in 1610. Owned by Henry Faulconer in 1633 but sold to Edward Payne of EG in 1649
     
     

 

  1. Gravetye Manor: Gravetye first appears as a manor in 1571, when Richard Infield died seised of it, leaving an infant son Richard. The second Richard died in 1619, and his eldest son, a third Richard, in 1625, when it passed by will to his brother James Infield, who died without issue in 1633. Gravetye then passed to his widow Mary, who subsequently married the Rev. John Killingworth, and with him, in 1635, settled the manor on three of James Infield's sisters and their husbands, namely Agnes and Henry Faulconer, Cordell and John Watson, and Bridget Infield, who afterwards married John Saunders. They were still holding the manor in 1647, but in 1651 it is said to have been conveyed by Henry Faulconer (presumably the surviving heir) to Edward Payne. The latter died in 1660 and Gravetye passed to his second son Richard, and in turn to his son and grandson, both Richard. (http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=56941 .)
    Gravetye Manor - West Sussex, England
  2. Burstow Park: This is the manor-house of Burstow Court Manor, in Burstow, Surrey . It is situated about 1 mile north of Outwood, Surrey and about ten miles from West Hoathly. See Map Old Surrey map of Burstow & Outwood . ( However, for confusion, there is also a Burstow Lodge (now called Burstow Manor) 1 mile south of Outwood in Rookery lane).
    Burstow Park Farm is known to have been the site of the Manor House from which the greater part of the Burstow Estate was administered from medieval times until the later Victorian period. Through much of the earlier period the Manor was part of the Manor of Wimbledon (Mortlake) owned by the Archbishops of Canterbury. By the early 16th century the manor had been leased by the then Archbishop (Primate Warham) to Sir John Gaye. At the dissolution the property then passed to the Kings then first minister, Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex along with the rest of the manor of Wimbledon. The property was passed to the crown in 1590 and then given to Thomas Cecil, first son of William Cecil, Lord Burghly, who promptly sold it to Sir Thomas Shirley. The Deer Park was probably disemparked during the commonwealth period and the land enclosed to form several farms. The Manor House at Burstow Park Farm became the centre of the most important of these and new farmsteads were created at Hookhouse and Stonehouse farms around this time. http://www.archaeologyse.co.uk/ReportLibrary/2007/2007-2513-Burstow-Park-Farm-Surrey.pdf
    Burstow Park Farm
    Burstow Park Farmhouse is undoubtedly architecturally significant in its medieval core, but also in the development of the farmhouse over a period of four centuries. The comparatively humble hall house with tall and narrow proportions was significantly enlarged by the addition of the ranges to north and east in the late 16th century and again in 1640.

    It was sold to to Richard Infield or Innyngfield in 1610. He (actually his son) in 1625 made a settlement on himself in tail, with contingent remainder to his brother and to his nephew Innyngfield Falconer, son of his sister Agnes. He died in 1625 and was succeeded by his brother. Henry and Agnes Falconer were seised of the manor in 1633. It was conveyed by Falconer to Edward Payne in 1649, when the Park is mentioned as still existing. Richard Payne, perhaps his son, was owner in 1669. In 1697 Richard's son John Payne was holding it, and in 1701 settled it on his intended wife, Anne Gage. ( http://www.british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=42952 )