Peter Brown Family History

Cousin Relationships

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The following tables helps define the various relationships between cousins.

If one person's →

Grandparent

Great-grandparent

Great-great-grandparent

Great3-grandparent

Great4-grandparent

Great5-grandparent

is the other person's

then they are ↘

Grandparent

1st cousins

1st cousins once removed

1st cousins twice removed

1st cousins thrice removed

1st cousins four times removed

1st cousins five times removed

Great-grandparent

1st cousins once removed

2nd cousins

2nd cousins once removed

2nd cousins twice removed

2nd cousins thrice removed

2nd cousins four times removed

Great-great-grandparent

1st cousins twice removed

2nd cousins once removed

3rd cousins

3rd cousins once removed

3rd cousins twice removed

3rd cousins thrice removed

Great3-grandparent

1st cousins thrice removed

2nd cousins twice removed

3rd cousins once removed

4th cousins

4th cousins once removed

4th cousins twice removed

Great4-grandparent

1st cousins four times removed

2nd cousins thrice removed

3rd cousins twice removed

4th cousins once removed

5th cousins

5th cousins once removed

Great5-grandparent

1st cousins five times removed

2nd cousins four times removed

3rd cousins thrice removed

4th cousins twice removed

5th cousins once removed

6th cousins

For example, a person with whom you share a grandparent (but not a parent) is a first cousin; someone with whom you share a great-grandparent (but not a grandparent) is a second cousin; and someone with whom you share a great-great-grandparent (but not a great-grandparent) is a third cousin; and so on. The child of your first cousin is your first cousin once removed because the one generation separating you and the child (the cousin) represents one remove. You and the child are still considered first cousins, as your own grandparent (this child's great-grandparent), as the most recent common ancestor, represents one degree.